Red Cross Volunteers in Missouri Go to Texas to Help in Flood Relief

American Red Cross volunteers from Southern Missouri are among those going to Texas to help with the massive flood relief efforts in that state.

Ten volunteers this week from Greene, Jasper, Taney, Laclede, Douglas and Hickory counties headed to Austin and Houston to work in damage assessment and sheltering.

Red Cross volunteers from around the country have been responding to the devastating flooding after some parts of Texas received 19 inches of rain over the holiday weekend.  Some 300 Red Cross volunteers are providing shelter, meals, health services and emotional support with partners like Southern Baptist Disaster Relief.

This map from The Weather Channel shows the amount of rainfall in Texas during the month of May. The rainfall has caused flooding throughout large portions of the state. Red Cross volunteers are in Texas helping those displaced by the high water.
This map from The Weather Channel shows the amount of rainfall in Texas during the month of May. The rainfall has caused flooding throughout large portions of the state. Red Cross volunteers are in Texas helping those displaced by the high water.

“This part of the country has been hit with multiple disasters for months now, and the Red Cross has been helping from day one,” said Brad Kieserman, vice president, Disaster Services Operations and Logistics for the Red Cross. “Our volunteers will remain in these communities in the weeks ahead to make sure people get the help they need.”

Since the beginning of the year, numerous storms have ravaged the state, displacing thousands of families and devastating homes and businesses. Last spring, Texas also suffered a rash of floods, tornadoes and storms that destroyed thousands of homes and uprooted families in more than 100 counties.

Over the weekend, Brenham, Texas, located about 65 miles northwest of Houston, received 18 inches of rain in a 24-hour period. Houston, which has been hammered with severe weather and flooding for several months, was again in the storm’s path and people were forced to leave their homes.

The threat isn’t over – weather experts predict flooding will continue for several more days. Emergency officials estimate that some 6,000 homes may be affected. The Red Cross is monitoring the ongoing threat for more flooding and is setting up in areas that are likely to be hit by the next onslaught of bad weather later this week.

The Red Cross has opened or is supporting 15 shelters in Texas to help people forced from their homes by ongoing mandatory evacuations. Red Cross volunteers will also be delivering relief supplies as soon as it is safe to do so.

The Red Cross is monitoring the ongoing threat for more flooding and is setting up in areas that are likely to be hit by the next onslaught of bad weather later this week.

From Spring 2015 through mid-April this year,  the Red Cross has spent or committed some $10.2 million for disaster relief in Texas, with 48 percent for food, shelter and relief items; 45 percent for individual emergency assistance and recovery; 6 percent for health and emotional support; and 1 percent to support community recovery.

You can help people affected by disasters in Texas and elsewhere by visiting redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS or texting REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

The threat of severe weather isn’t limited to Texas, so download the free Red Cross Emergency App to receive emergency alerts and information about what to do in case of flooding and other disasters, as well as locations of shelters. The App also includes emergency first aid information and a Family Safe feature which allows people to instantly see if loved ones are OK. The Emergency App is available in app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps.

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